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Kevin Kelly: How Linux Will Shape the Future of Technology

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Linux
Interviews

The operating system of the future is still to be determined but LInux will play an important role in creating it, says Kevin Kelly, a founding editor and Senior Maverick at Wired Magazine. Just as no one could predict what the Internet would look like 20 years ago, we can't begin to imagine future technology. But Kelly envisions the Technium, a global interconnected super organism. The Technium is one step up from the Internet of today but can hardly be compared with it.

What will this organism look like and how will it function? The details are to come in his keynote talk at LinuxCon and CloudOpen North America in New Orleans, Sept. 16-18, 2013. Here, Kelly gives us a taste of that talk, and discusses how the Linux community can contribute to the Technium and continue to innovate.

Can you give us a preview of your talk? What is the Technium?




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