Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The What Why and How of Wayland and Weston on Linux

Filed under
Software

Let's start from the beginning, because even though Wayland has been in development for over five years there is still a lot of misunderstanding of what it is. Wayland is a display server protocol that is intended to replace the X Window System. We've had X for 27 years, and computing has changed a wee bit in that time. Back in the olden days we had text terminals and every little pixel was precious. Now we have great honking graphics cards with more processing power than the servers and workstations of yesteryear, multiple displays, smartphones and tablets, embedded devices, and users who are not going to settle for colorful ANSI displays, but want complex 3D graphics. And why shouldn't Linux lead the way in graphics rendering? Are we not overdue for holodecks? And who would ever want to leave their holodeck? Though, as figure 1 shows, you can make some cool color images with ANSI.

The Evolution of X

X has been showing its age for the past 10-12 years, and has acquired a considerable cruft base in that time, to the point that it is more in the way than useful. You younguns might not remember, but back in the olden days of Linux we had to configure X manually, and it controlled displays, mice and keyboards. Yes, keyboards and mice. Why? Darned if I know. This is what I wrote in my awesome Linux Cookbook, published in 2004:

"XF86Config requires that you know configuration data about your mouse, keyboard, video adapter, and monitor. It takes you through setup line by line, asking questions until you're ready to explode. Most important are the name of your video card, the amount of video RAM, and the horizontal/vertical refresh rates for your monitor."

Rest here




More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Rolls Out Version 4.1 of KVM Platform

Red Hat has just launched Red Hat Virtualization 4.1. The company says that this product is "the latest release of the company's Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM)-powered enterprise virtualization platform." The goal, the company says is to provide "an open source infrastructure and centralized management solution for virtualized servers and workstations." Red Hat describes some of the platform's upgrades: Read more

GNOME To Do 3.24 release, and it’s shining

GNOME To Do is a personal task manager for GNOME. It uses GNOME technologies and integrates very well with the desktop. And now, it’s finally being released! The 3.24 version comes with a few nice features and, most importantly, whole load of bugfixes. Let’s get started! Read more

TrueOS STABLE Update: 4/24/17

After testing the UNSTABLE push over the weekend, the devs are happy to release a new STABLE update and installation files today! This update consists of two parts: installer changes for those who install TrueOS fresh, and general updates for systems with TrueOS already installed. Read more Also: TrueOS 20170424 Stable Update

How to track and secure open source in your enterprise

Recently, SAS issued a rather plaintive call for enterprises to limit the number of open source projects they use to a somewhat arbitrary percentage. That seems a rather obvious attempt to protest the rise of the open source R programming language for data science and analysis in a market where SAS has been dominant. But there is a good point hidden in the bluster: Using open source responsibly means knowing what you’re using so you can track and maintain it. Read more