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Is This Finally the Year of Open Source...in China?

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OSS

One of the long-running jokes in the free software world is that this year will finally be the year of open source on the desktop - just like it was last year, and the year before that. Thanks to the astounding rise of Android, people now realise that the desktop is last decade's platform, and that mobile - smartphones and tablets - are the future. But I'd argue that there is something even more important these, and that is the widespread deployment of open source in China.

Here's why. China is already the number two economy in the world, and will become number one if current trends continue. It is the digital workshop of the world, where leading consumer electronics devices are made. And, last but not least, there are a number of companies like Huawei and ZTC that are likely to become the new Apples and Samsungs sometime in the near future. For all these reasons, it is imperative that open source become the norm in China, which will then push it out to the rest of the world for purely selfish, business reasons (and nothing wrong with that.)

That has led me to be on the look-out for signs for the year of open source in China.

rest here




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