Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Advanced Text Editors Compared: kate vs gedit

Filed under
Software

Any Linux user will tell you that a good text editor is a vital component of a computer system, no matter if you’re a new user or a seasoned pro. While using a Terminal text editor (like nano or vim) is equally important, you might as well make use of your graphical desktop environment whenever it’s available to you.

kate, KDE‘s default text editor, and gedit, Gnome‘s default text editor, are powerful tools that can get the job done and then some. However, if you’re making the all-important decision of which desktop environment you want to use, taking a look at all of the related applications is a given. I considered both apps based on their features, flexibility, and ease of use in order to determine which one is the ultimate winner.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Webconverger 26 Is a Secure Kiosk OS That Doesn't Store Any Data

Webconverger is a distribution designed and developed with a single goal in mind, namely to provide the best Kiosk experience possible. This means that people will be able to use that OS as a regular system, although its functionality will be limited and it will be impossible to install any other apps. This is a very helpful solution if this is a public PC, like in a library or a cafe, and it preserves the quality of the installation for a very long time. Because users can't interact with it on a deeper level, the operating system will remain stable and it will be pretty much the same like in the first day that it was used. Read more

Today in Techrights

5 more killer features Windows 9 should steal from Linux

If the latest Windows 9 leaks are any indication, some of the operating system's coolest new features will look a lot like what Linux users already enjoy: Like the virtual desktops Linux users have had since the 90’s, and a centralized notification center like the one available in GNOME Shell. Windows 9 also looks like it'll co-opt Ubuntu’s vision of a single operating system interface that can run on all form factors, complete with apps that run in windowed mode when it makes more sense to do so. Who would have imagined? Windowed applications are a big new feature in Windows. Read more

French ministries prove free software is viable

Free and open source software solutions are suitable for use in public administrations, the extensive use by French ministries proves. The LibreOffice suite of office productivity tools is now installed on more than 500,000 desktops across the ministries. The combination of Postgres, a relational database system and servers running the Linux operating system is also very common. Read more