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32bit Vs 64bit. The War Continues

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Hardware

When AMD64 (AMD) and EM64T (Intel) CPU technology was new and ready for the prime market, there was much talk about whether the real-world was ready for 64bit computing in the consumer sector. At the time, 64bit computing had been around in the server sector for quite some time.

Well, it’s now 2013 and we are still talking about whether 64bit computing is ready, as opposed to good old reliable 32bit.

In my observations of the situation, there’s a few things that I would like to point out. 64bit computing is just perfect the way it is. The same goes for 32bit computing, for it’s target market it still serves its purpose well.

When the topic comes up for discussion, as it so often does particularly in the Linux community, there’s a particular theme that is consistent with all views of 32bit. The common theme and question pondered is “Why do we still have 32bit operating systems?”

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