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Case study: Nexor dumps ageing proprietary operating system for open source OS

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A robust IT platform is critical for Nexor, which provides IT services and email gateways to defence and intelligence and government organisations. But the company was finding it increasingly difficult to deliver IT services and develop products on an ageing, proprietary operating system. It overcame the IT limitations by migrating to the open source Red Hat Enterprise Linux operating system (OS).

The Nottingham-based firm develops messaging and guard solutions for the defence and intelligence market. Its customers are both UK and global, and include government departments, transport organisations, the energy sector and police forces.

One of its key products, Nexor Sentinel, is a secure email gateway service that protects user organisations by validating inbound and outbound electronic messages to conform to the security policies of the protected domain.

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