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4 text editors for Linux

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Software

This is a short list of my favorite graphical text editors for Linux that can be classified as IDE (integrated development environment). Here, I give the pros and cons of working with the following:

gedit

Gedit is probably the text editor I use most and the official text editor of the GNOME desktop environment. I've written more about it here.

While aiming at simplicity and ease of use, gedit is a powerful general purpose text editor is released under the terms of the GNU General Public License and is free software.

Features

gedit includes syntax highlighting for various program code and text markup formats (C, C++, Java, HTML, XML, Python, Perl, and many others). gedit also has GUI tabs for editing multiple files. Tabs can be moved between various windows by the user.

rest here




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