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A Second Helping of Pi

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Linux
Hardware
Software

In my last article I described how to set up a Raspberry Pi as a network attached storage (NAS) device and UPnP media server. By the time I was done with that project I was so impressed with the power and flexibility of the Pi that I decided to order another unit and set it up to replace my Linux Mint-based home entertainment system computer.

quick literature search indicated that the Pi had plenty of power to stream even 1080p HD movies, and that XBMC would be a natural choice for a Pi-based home entertainment system.

One search result returned this page listing three pre-built XBMC Raspberry Pi images. After reading through the clear, well-written installation instructions I chose the Raspbmc image, although I suspect that OpenELEC and XBian are also good XBMC implementations.

For this system I chose a different case than the one I used for the NAS. The Adafruit Industries clear case is really slick, it only took about 5 minutes to peel all the paper off the flat pieces and snap it together with the Pi inside. Here's what the assembled case looks like in my entertainment center, sitting on top of the gig-e switch and snuggled up next to the Roku player:

rest here




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