Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

nano vs. vim: Terminal Text Editors Compared

Filed under
Software

One of the primary ways to use the Terminal is to configure text files Terminal text editors and control how certain programs or system services behave. For terminal text editing, two of the top choices are nano and vim. In order to determine which one is better, we’ll look at features and general ease of use. While system resource usage could also technically be considered in this comparison, it’s safe to assume that as terminal text editors they require a negligible amount of system resources.

History

The nano project was created in 1999 in order to emulate the Pico text editor but improve on it. nano also claims to be 2/3 to 1/8 the size of the Pico binary, which makes it very lean and usable on even the weakest systems. vim, originally developed in 1991, is based on the original vi text editor that was developed in 1976. Therefore, like nano, vim aims to improve upon the project that it’s based on. As of right now, these two along with emacs are still the top contenders for Terminal text editing.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

3 open source link shorteners

Nobody likes an impossibly long URL. They're hard to decipher. But sometimes, between a deep directory structure on a site, plus a large number of parameters tacked on to the end, URLs just begin to get unwieldy. And back in the days before Twitter added their own link shortener to their service, a long URL meant taking precious characters away from your tweets. Read more

Ubuntu Server: The smart person's guide

Ubuntu Server is an open source platform that does more than you might think. With its ability to serve as an internal company server or to scale all the way up and out to meet enterprise-level needs, this operating system can do it all. This smart person's guide is an easy way to get up to speed on Ubuntu Server. We'll update this guide periodically when news and updates about Ubuntu Server are released. Read more

Rockstor 3.9.0 NAS Distro Adds Big Enhancements to the Disk Management Subsystem

Suman Chakravartula from the Rockstor project, an open-source NAS (Network-attached storage) solution using the Linux kernel and Btrfs file system, announced the general availability of Rockstor 3.9.0. Read more

Escuelas Linux 5.2 Officially Released with LibreOffice 5.3.1 & Google Chrome 57

Alejandro Diaz informs Softpedia today about the general availability of Escuelas Linux 5.2, the newest and most advanced version of his Bodhi/Ubuntu-based GNU/Linux distribution designed for educational purposes. Read more