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Arch Linux Reinventing The Filesystem Structure?

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Linux

Unix and Linux has changed, evolved and matured. But there’s one thing that has not changed too much from the very beginnings. And it is something that we probably all take for granted and don’t really think too much about. I can admit, until recently I had not given it much thought. I am referring to the structure of the Unix/Linux filesystem.

I mention Unix because ultimately, that’s where our current filesystem structure originated. It’s a slightly long and complicated story about how we got to where we did today when it comes to the filesystem structure that we today take for granted. It’s actually a very intriguing historical path with many different standards, past and present. And even a brand new draft for a new standard in the making. It’s definitely something I will revisit at a later date at Unixmen. Admittedly, not much has changed over the years as there really has been no reason for major change.

The developers at Arch Linux beg to differ. They’ve taken things in to their own hands.

rest here




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