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AMD's new site plan draws environmentalist's ire

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Hardware

One of Austin's largest employers is upping its commitment to the city by building a brand new facility in Southwest Austin.

Advanced Micro Devices will break ground on its new complex on the Southeast corner of William Cannon and Southwest Parkway in early 2006.

The lush hillside site in the Lantana development is where AMD plans its new facility. The complex will take up about 60 acres, and part of it will be in the environmentally sensitive Barton Springs Watershed.

AMD says its concerned about the needs of the area and is taking measures to preserve it.

"When you are looking at protecting the aquifer, you're really talking about two things. One, the water quality controls that are laid out by the city's SOS ordinance. We are going to meet those water quality controls. The second big piece is the preservation of space over the recharge zone," AMD representative Travis Bullard said.

AMD plans to donate $5 million to set aside land over the recharge zone that will be prohibited from development.

But that's not enough for environmentalists. The Save Our Springs Alliance believes AMD's plan will poison the aquifer.

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