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Does Google Still Provide Relevant Search Results? [Poll]

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Google

You know that you have developed something big when your service becomes a verb. While there are plenty of search engines on the scene, it’s Google more often than not is the preferred choice. We don’t Bing or Yahoo for information. We “Google” it. But is the service still the same after all these years? Are the search results provided by Google still relevant?

Google is constantly updating its search algorithm and added many factors that were non-existent a year back. Yet, it seems that the search results are showing more of its own services, like YouTube, Google+, rather than the results that you are really interested in. How many times does the website you are looking for pop up in the first few results, after the requisite ads, of course?

Are you finding that you have to comb through page after page of results to find what you’re looking for, or do you find relevant results just as quickly as you always have? Let us know in this week’s poll: are the Google search results still as relevant as they always were?

Take Our Poll

Here are the results of last week’s poll:




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