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Are there too many Linux distros? Is distro overload killing Linux on the desktop?

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Christine Hall at Foss Force considers whether or not Linux offers too much in the way of choice for users. Do we have too many distros available? Has that hurt the adoption of Linux on the desktop?

I'm inclined to agree with her that choice isn't the problem with desktop Linux. In fact, the range of choices available are one of the primary strengths of Linux. It's what sets Linux apart from Windows (gag!) and OS X (pretty but locked up tight by Apple).

With Linux, each user can find and use the distro that works best for him or her. Nobody is stuck with something that they hate and don't want to use. Compare that to Windows, particularly the mess that is Windows 8. Users are mostly stuck with whatever Microsoft gives them.

rest here

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