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Softpedia

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Linking to Softpedia.com articles has always presented a bit of a moral dilemma. They cover things that others don't or many times identify an angle no one else has. I like their little news blurbs. But I don't like that they link to downloads on their own server instead of the source.

I know many of these like sites can't be trusted. You have no idea what they may have put in the binary. I don't think Softpedia is doing that. I don't know for sure, but I almost believe they just download the file and serve it up. They are using the download numbers to beef-up their web numbers, or somehow making money off the downloads. But I still feel funny linking to their stuff and have since the beginning. I just always hoped folks would know it's better to download from the original source after reading how cool Softpedia said it was.

Anyway, I want folks to know that I link to Softpedia for their coverage, but don't really support downloading from them; although if I even suspected for a second they were tainted I wouldn't.

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