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Novena open source laptop trades Raspberry Pi headers for power

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Former Chumby developer Andrew "bunnie" Huang has shared more details about his Novena open source development laptop on his blog. After having announced the project at the end of last year, the hardware hacker says he went back to the work bench and revised the board design, going with a more powerful FPGA and dropping the Raspberry-Pi-compatible extension header and analogue I/O ports in favour of a much faster expansion header. The new Spartan 6 LX45 FPGA includes a 2Gbit DDR3 buffer and can reach 800MT/s throughput, according to Huang.

To satisfy his desire for a high resolution screen on his development laptop, Huang designed an interface that supports mezzanine adapter boards for different displays. The first adapter board that has been created supports a 13 inch HiDPI screen with a resolution of 2560x1700 pixels. At the moment there is no case for the laptop and Huang is currently testing the hardware with all components loosely plugged into each other with an external keyboard and mouse. The development version of the system is running the ARMhf version of Ubuntu with a custom kernel, but Huang says that this choice is not final and that he is "testing a broad field of distros for compatibility and convenience."

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