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SalixOS - The Miracle of Upgrading When It Actually Works

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Following on from my previous post on Slackware I have to root for SalixOS here which has almost slipped out of sight over the last two years or so after a spectacular start. It handled everything I've thrown at it which is more than I can say for any other distribution. The story goes like this:

Salix 13.0.2 installed in 2009 and upgraded to 13.1 in June 2010, this included a downgrade after initially leaving out the kernel and mesa-libs which resulted in choppy screensavers and no GL acceleration. After deliberating, I did a full upgrade and arrived at the expected result.
13.1 ran fine here until last month, June 2013, when I decided to upgrade to 13.37 and straight from there to 14.0. Again, no issues were encountered. All one has to do is stick to the excellent upgrade instructions in the wiki, so effective and simple my cat could do it. I really recommend the User documentation and FAQ sections on the documentation hub.

rest here

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