Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

At the Sounding Edge: Music Notation Software, the Final Installment

Filed under

Dave wraps up his discussion of music notation programs with a look at FOMUS and a new one on the horizon, MuseScore.

David Psenicka's FOMUS (FOrmat MUSic) holds a unique position among LilyPond helper applications. In point of fact, FOMUS is much more than another front-end for LilyPond. According to its author, FOMUS has been designed "to facilitate the conversion of raw algorithmic output into readable music notation". FOMUS is a Lisp-based utility that can run in standalone mode or as an integral part of a more general composition program. In this article, I demonstrate FOMUS in both modes.

In essence, FOMUS does only one job, but it does that job very well.

MuseScore is an ambitious project that intends to provide Linux musicians with a true WYSIWYG music notation editor. Development is in its early stages, and the current 0.3 version is considered to be an alpha-stage project. However, MuseScore already is on its way to fulfilling its promise (see Figure 4). Among its more interesting working features, MuseScore supports TrueType fonts for its music symbols and imports and exports MIDI and MusicXML files. It also supports the JACK audio server and provides a hook to the excellent Fluidsynth soundfont synthesizer, for sounding your score without a JACK connection.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Science on Android

I have covered a lot of different scientific packages that are available under Linux in this space, but the focus has been on Linux running on desktop machines. This has been rather short-sighted, however, as lots of other platforms have Linux available and shouldn't be neglected. So in this article, I start looking at the type of science you can do on the Android platform. For my next several articles, I plan to include occasional Android applications that you may find useful. Read more

Linksys WRT router gains faster SoC, more RAM, OpenWrt

Linksys has launched a “WRT1900ACS” router that updates the AC version with a faster dual-core, 1.6GHz SoC, twice the RAM (at 512MB), and OpenWrt support. In early 2014 when Linksys resurrected the hackable Linksys WRT54G WiFi router in a new WRT1900AC model, the Belkin subsidiary said the the Linux-based router would also support the lightweight, networking-focused OpenWrt Linux distribution. With the new WRT1900ACS, Linksys is making life easier for OpenWrt lovers by providing full, open source OpenWrt support out of the box. Read more

New Renesas SoCs offer 1.5GHz, 1080p, GbE, USB 3.0, PCIe

The RZ/G updates the Renesas Electronics RZ line of system-on-chips, which includes the Linux-ready RZ/A1 line of single-core, 400MHz Cortex-A9 SoCs, as well as an RZ/T line that runs an RTOS on a Cortex-M4 microcontroller. The new devices are aimed at a wide range of Linux- and Android embedded products including hand-held medical devices, digital signage, and industrial, home appliance, and office equipment devices that use a human-machine interface (HMI), says the Japanese semiconductor firm. Read more

Fedora OpenID issues resolved

It is very likely that you have seen the issues we had with logging in to Fedora Infrastructure services, or other websites that use Fedora OpenID to authenticate you. Read more