Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Mir, the Canonical CLA and skewing the playing field

Filed under
OSS
Ubuntu

Like many Canonical-led projects, Mir is under GPLv3 - a strong copyleft license. There's a couple of aspects of GPLv3 that are intended to protect users from being unable to make use of the rights that the license grants them. The first is that if GPLv3 code is shipped as part of a user product, it must be possible for the user to replace that GPLv3 code. That's a problem if your device is intended to be locked down enough that it can only run vendor code. The second is that it grants an explicit patent license to downstream recipients, permitting them to make use of those patents in derivative works.

One of the consequences of these obligations is that companies whose business models depend on either selling locked-down devices or licensing patents tend to be fairly reluctant to ship GPLv3 software. In effect, this is GPLv3 acting entirely as intended - unless you're willing to guarantee that a user can exercise the freedoms defined by the free software definition, you don't get to ship GPLv3 material. Some companies have decided that shipping GPLv3 code would be more expensive than either improving existing code under a more liberal license or writing new code from scratch.

rest here




Also: Canonical's Mir move doesn't sit well with some Linux developers
And: Ubuntu community donation plans detailed

More in Tux Machines

University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more