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Oracle doesn't understand open source: Monty

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MariaDB founder Ulf Michael "Monty" Widenius says that Oracle has failed to make a success of MySQL because the company doesn't understand open source. "It's not in their blood," Widenius, one of the three co-founders of MySQL, told iTWire in an interview.

"It's not in their DNA," Monty (pictured above) added. "They are trying to run open source development the same way as they run closed source development and that is a big mistake."

Recently, Red Hat, the Linux distribution most widely used by businesses, announced it would be replacing MySQL in its forthcoming 7.0 release and replacing it with MariaDB, a fork of MySQL maintained by Monty and his firm, Monty Program. Monty's company has merged with SkySQL, where another MySQL co-founder David Axmark is the CTO. The third MySQL co-founder, Allan Larsson, is also working with Monty by providing help and advice when needed.

Monty said the main reason people had started looking for alternatives to MySQL was probably because Oracle had proved it did not want to play well with the open source community.

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