Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Debian 7: A So-So Distro Not Worth Switching For

Filed under
Linux

After a hiatus of more than two years, the developers of Debian last month released a major upgrade. That surely came as good news to fans of this granddaddy Linux OS, but the new Debian 7 "Wheezy" may not be worth the wait if you are happily using more popular Linux options.

I feel somewhat like a turncoat for saying that about Debian Linux -- I should be revering its 20-year-long lineage. I do respect what Debian Linux represents. Debian is the foundation for many other more modern Linux distros, including Ubuntu, Linux Mint and so many more.

Nevertheless, it is considerably less appealing as an everyday workhorse operating system. Wheezy is just about as exciting as its name is unattractive. Debian 7 by design is a bulwark of stability. However, it is not a showcase for the latest distro developments. To be kind, this latest Debian Linux release has little or no flash-bang impact under its hood.

rest here




Slandering Debian GNU/Linux

mrpogson.com: It’s disgusting that such stuff gets published on Linuxinsider. Clearly the authour is an ignorant outsider:

“it is not a showcase for the latest distro developments. To be kind, this latest Debian Linux release has little or no flash-bang impact under its hood.”

If he wanted the latest developments he could use the testing or experimental flavours of Debian GNU/Linux. He knows that because he writes later, “You have your Stable Debian, you have your Testing Debian and you have your Unstable Debian.”

so lack of the latest packages is not a fault of Debian GNU/Linux but an abuse of the stable flavour. You don’t criticize the centre of the football team for not being a wide receiver…

rest here

Seldom read a more un/misinformed review.

Seldom read a more un/misinformed review. And he pretends to be using Linux for several years and to have installed Debian before? Installed perhaps, but not run it for any length of time to get knowledgeable about it.
Complaining about the age of a 3.2 kernel that is constantly updated, receiving backported patches for new hardware like Red hat's does, just goes to show his ignorance. And so it goes on. Linux insider? It's one thing to dislike a distro because you want the latest kiddie bling but at least be honest - and get a clue what you're writing about.
A poor show that does not reflect well on the publishing web site for their lack of judgement.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Living The Linux Laptop Lifestyle

Another great advantage of open source software: you can run it off of a flash drive before installing it. And I have to admit that I loved Linux Lite's out-of-the-box feel, so much so that I reconsidered installing my number two selection: LXLE, which is designed for underpowered older machines. According to a label on the bottom of my Toughbook, this pre-Linux laptop was decommissioned in 2005, making it well over ten years old. And so I replaced the RAM, installed Linux Lite, and after a short period, I was back to living a Linux laptop lifestyle while waiting for my charger. Read more

Mentor Embedded Linux gains cloud-based IoT platform

Mentor announced a “Mentor Embedded IoT Framework” platform that builds on top of Mentor Embedded Linux with cloud-based IoT cloud services ranging from device authentication and provisioning to monitoring and diagnostics. Mentor’s Mentor Embedded IoT Framework (MEIF) extends its Yocto Project based Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) and Nucleus RTOS development platforms to provide cloud services for IoT device management. The platform mediates between these platforms and cloud service backends, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Eclipse IoT, Microsoft Azure, and Siemens MindSphere. Read more

Bang & Olufsen’s RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers

B&O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC. Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to create the open source, $189 Beocreate 4 channel amplifier kit. The 180 x 140 x 30mm DSP/DAC/amplifier board pairs with your BYO Raspberry Pi 3 with a goal of upcycling vintage passive speakers. Read more