Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux continues to rule supercomputers

Filed under
Linux

The June 2013 TOP500 supercomputer list is in and 476 of the top 500 fastest supercomputers in the world run Linux.

Is that good enough for you? While Linux fans and critics obsess about Linux's failure to sweep Windows off the desktop, they're ignoring that Linux is winning everywhere else and that when it comes to the highest of high-end computing, Linux rules.

Driving the point home, the top ten fastest supercomputers all run Linux of one sort or the other. You have to go the way to the 44th fastest computer, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts box, which runs IBM's AIX Unix variant, to find one that doesn't run Linux.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Security: MuddyWater, DJI, Updates, Reproducible Builds and Excel

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

7 tools for analyzing performance in Linux with bcc/BPF

A new technology has arrived in Linux that can provide sysadmins and developers with a large number of new tools and dashboards for performance analysis and troubleshooting. It's called the enhanced Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF, or just BPF), although these enhancements weren't developed in Berkeley, they operate on much more than just packets, and they do much more than just filtering. I'll discuss one way to use BPF on the Fedora and Red Hat family of Linux distributions, demonstrating on Fedora 26. BPF can run user-defined sandboxed programs in the kernel to add new custom capabilities instantly. It's like adding superpowers to Linux, on demand. Examples of what you can use it for include: Read more