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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 512

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's 24th issue of DistroWatch Weekly! The term "free software" is a concept that tends to be ignored by the majority of Linux distributions, and by extension, the majority of users. And yet, without the Free Software Foundation and its software licensing the Linux community would be a lot poorer than it is. Trisquel GNU/Linux is one of the very few exceptions as it strictly adheres to the FSF guidelines when it comes to shipping free software only; Jesse Smith reviews the project's latest version, 6.0, in this week's featured article.

In the news section, Red Hat reveals its intention to default to the GNOME "Classic" mode in the upcoming Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 release, Debian announces the first security and bug-fix update to "Wheezy", and Mageia releases new installation images to correct an embarrassing bug. Also in this week's issue, a user shares his experiences with migrating from Linux to FreeBSD, a first look at Wayland as shipped by RebeccaBlackOS, and a plethora of new distribution submissions to keep our distro-hoppers busy. Finally, we are pleased to announce that the recipient of the May 2013 DistroWatch.com donation is the DOSBox project which receives US$250.00 in cash.

Happy reading!




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