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One Week With GNOME 3: Conclusions

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Software

Yesterday (Day Six) was a very busy day at my day-job filled mostly with meetings, so I didn’t get a great deal of time to play with additional features of GNOME Classic. I did notice one bug with how workspaces are handled in Classic mode that was a bit troublesome. When I locked the screen and unlocked it again, my windows would shift workspaces to fill up any gaps with empty workspaces. The response I got in the Bugzilla ticket agrees with my assumption that the GNOME Shell switches back to dynamic workspaces while locked and therefore removes the unused workspaces.

On my drive in this morning, I was thinking more about the things I like with GNOME Classic and another subtlety came to mind. Up there with the list of things that you don’t really recognize until you think about it hard is the advantages of having the window selector in the lower taskbar.

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