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How I used eog utility to pull off a small Linux exploit

Back in 2012, after my article on Linux ELF Virus was published in Linux Journal, I was curious to come up with a trigger point for this virus. I mean what would compel a Linux user to execute it for the very first time? I thought about it many times but could not come up with something in a working state.

Cut to the present times – Last Friday, when I was coming back from my office through office bus, I was indulged in some technical talk with a guy who works on encoders and decoders for various media file formats. Suddenly the same thought struck in my mind and I asked him whether it is possible for him to come up with a situation where a Linux user clicks on an image file, the image gets displayed but a notorious code gets executed in the back end?

rest here




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