Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ode to Machine Architecture

Filed under
Hardware
Software

I have been writing lately about the importance of learning the underlying tenants of computing if you are going to be a great programmer, and in particular some machine language and computer architecture.

It typically does not make a difference which architecture you learn, or which machine language, as long as the architecture and machine language can illustrate the basic concepts of computing to a level that is useful in future studies of operating systems design and compiler theory, helping you to under stand issues like cache management, interrupt handling and I/O.

This blog entry, however, is not going to talk about those issues. Instead it will talk about a few instances in my life where knowing assembly language helped me immensely in solving problems.

rest here




Architecture Does Matter

People seemed to like my blog yesterday about how the knowledge of assembly and machine language improved my programs, or the programs of people around me.

Today I would like to show people how simply understanding a little about the architecture of the machine and operating system, even without knowing assembly language, can improve program performance. Likewise the study of algorithms and computer techniques.

rest here

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Fedora 23 EOL, Bye to FBDEV, Installfests of Yore

With Fedora 25 safely out of the door, time has come to bid adieu to version 23. Users are urged to upgrade. Elsewhere, Robin Miller looked back at an activity that older Linux users may remember, the Linux installfest. Michael Larabel reported today that the kernel may drop framebuffer device drivers and Dustin Kirkland shared Ubuntu's security overview. Read more Also: neon User LTS, openSUSE Upgrades, Best Distro Poll

Chromium/Chrome News

It's Been A Quiet Year-End For BUS1, The Proposed In-Kernel IPC For Linux

With the Linux 4.10 kernel merge window expected to open this weekend, I was digging around to see whether there was anything new on the BUS1 front and whether we might see it for the next kernel cycle. While I have yet to see any official communication from the BUS1 developers, it doesn't look like it's happening for BUS1. In fact, it's been a rather quiet past few weeks for these developers working on this in-kernel IPC mechanism to succeed the never-merged KDBUS. Read more Also: Intel Working On 5-Level Paging To Increase Linux Virtual/Physical Address Space

Games for GNU/Linux