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Move Aside, GTX 680: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 770 Review

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Hardware

In late 2010, NVIDIA unveiled the second model to populate its GeForce 500 series, the GTX 570. With it came a card that performed just about on-par with the previous-generation’s champ, the GTX 480. Fast-forward to today, and we’re experiencing a bit of a deja vu moment; the just-announced GTX 770 becomes the direct replacement of the GTX 680.

To call NVIDIA’s GeForce GTX 770 a “GTX 680 w/ a new name” would be a major understatement, however. While it is based on the same GK104 architecture, unlike the GK110 which the GTX 780 (our review) uses, it bundles in all of the 700 series niceties (such as GPU Boost 2.0), sports the same cooler as the GTX 780, and, perhaps best of all, is priced at $399 USD.

Considering the fact that the GTX 780 is priced $150 higher than the GTX 680 was at its launch, it’s worth noting that the GTX 770 retains the same pricing that the GTX 670 had at its launch. Why? Because GTX 780 is based on the same silicon as TITAN and brings with it a couple of nice perks, such as 3GB (or 6GB) of GDDR5 and a 384-bit memory bus.

Given that, it might seem that the GTX 770 should be called the GTX 680 Ti or something similar, but because the 770 includes some exclusive 700 series perks (like GPU Boost 2.0 as mentioned above), NVIDIA’s naming scheme is justified. And, well, with 700 having launched, it makes no sense to roll-out a new product with an old name.

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