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RR64 Linux - My new favorite home desktop distro!

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Gentoo
Reviews

I am writing this review with the intent to spread the word about this new distribution because I really like it and it's not one of the mainstream distros out there. I don't have any affiliation with the author and have only tried this distro recently. I have concentrated on the high and low points but I have not included an excessive amount of screenshots as for me at least, I find surfing through numerous screenshots to be tedious. For those that don't know me, I work in the law enforcement computer forensics field and use computers and Linux at a fairly high level every day. Co-workers know me as the "Linux guy" and I regularly field questions from them regarding all things Linux. I am starting with a roundabout explanation of my Linux experience and history as I think it provides a good reference for the reader on where I am coming from when you read this review...

Full Review.

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