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Linux (or Unix) on Film: Pretty Little Liars

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Linux

In keeping up with the "gold" standard of cinematic computer hardware, episode 24 of Season 3 of this marvelously sexy TV thriller features a Macbook in the formulaic "hacking scene" (which all developers and techs wish TV writers would stop using). The desktop featured, however, is clearly not MacOSX's.

Considering how wealthy the protagonists and antagonists both are, it's nice to see the user (and the TV production staff) of the Macbook bothered to skin his/her MacOSX or used virtualization to run Linux or FreeBSD.

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