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Antergos Linux 2013.05.12 review

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Linux

Antergos Linux is a desktop distribution based on Arch Linux. The distribution started under the Cinnarch moniker with the objective of providing a Cinnamon-only desktop distribution using the same rolling release development model as its parent distribution.

It got its new name after the developers came to the conclusion that it was going to be extremely difficult to reconcile the Cinnamon and Arch Linux development models, opting instead to use GNOME 3 as the default desktop environment and provide support for other desktop environments.

This is my first review of the distribution. What I typically look for in desktop distributions are a good graphical installation, a sane and sensible default desktop configuration that just work, and all the graphical tools that will make managing the desktop easy for all users, especially those not familiar or not willing to use the command-line. In other words, a desktop distribution that you can install and start using without having to mess with configuration files or install simple tools that should have been installed out of the box is my type of distribution.

Does this first release of Antergos meet those criteria?




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