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10 amazing Linux desktop environments you've probably never seen

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Software

One of the most amazing things about Linux is how versatile it is. Let's face it - Windows and MacOS X are...boring. They look exactly how they look. When it comes to making your computer look and behave however you like, Linux is king. Let's take a stroll through some truly interesting, and beautiful, Linux Desktop Environments - the ones that many of us have never even seen.

xmonad

xmonad (all lower case) is a tiling window manager built in the Haskell programming language (which is interesting enough to qualify for inclusion in this list). So what is a “tiling window manager”? Simple - no overlapping windows. That may take a moment to sink in for those used to KDE, GNOME or modern Windows/Mac. You won't be grabbing any title bars to drag windows around, because window title bars don't really exist here. But virtual desktops and an intensely high level of customization mean you'll be quite productive. And did I mention how much faster your system will feel?

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