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Fedora Core 5: A very personal review

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I have finally completed the migration of my laptop from Debian Etch to Fedora Core 5
I would like to write about it and my impressions after 5 days of using Fedora. Fedora Core comes in a set of 5 CD-Roms, but you can install it from the net. I chose the first option, and it is important to actually have the 5 CDs ready for the installation (contrary to what one guy told me earlier). The installation was a breeze. Anaconda, the graphical installer, is a little bit less good-looking than the SuSE or Mandriva installers, but its even more effective.

I will not focus on the installation phase, but let me just say that nobody can fail its installation of Fedora Core 5. I chose to install both Gnome and KDE, and Fluxbox as the lightweight desktop environment.

I guess what you may want to know is how Fedora ran on my system:

Full Review.

In related topics:

I have my Toshiba laptop (A85-S1072) successfully runnign Fedora Core 5 with the sound, wireless networking, and mythtv frontend running.

These are just some quick notes on what I did to get everything working.

That Howto.

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