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Korora Linux 18 aims to deliver a friendlier Fedora

Filed under
Linux

There's no doubt that desktop Linux has become increasingly user-friendly over the years, but it's equally true that some distributions focus more on ease of use than others do.

Ubuntu and Linux Mint are two examples at the forefront of this usability trend, but recently I came across another that has put friendliness at the forefront of its goals.

Enter Korora, a distro that “was born out of a desire to make Linux easier for new users, while still being useful for experts,” in the project's own words. Originally based on Gentoo Linux when it launched in 2005, Korora was re-born in 2010 as a Fedora remix with tweaks and extr
as for additional usability.
Korora recently got a key update to version 18, and it looks intriguing.

Here's a summary of what's inside.




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