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Always-Releasable Debian Means Shorter Waits

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Linux

It took nearly two years for Debian 7.0 to reach the masses. Wirzenius and co-writer Russ Allbery (Debian hacker) say a big portion of that was eaten up by the 10-month freeze, which just stressed everyone out. Wheezy's freeze was four months longer than past releases and at that Wirzenius feels they are too long. He says, "We should aim for a short freeze, perhaps as short as two weeks, and certainly not longer than two months." But an "always releasable" Debian would require some big changes.

Wirzenius says the first thing that needs to change is their attitudes. He says everyone needs to take ownership of releases, not just the release team and realize that releases are important. He thinks testing should be kept free of RC bugs and use automatic testing more.

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