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Debian "Wheezy" 7.0 KDE Review: pure delight!

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Linux

Let me get it straight in the beginning, if you are a real distro hopper and always looking for the latest Linux world has to offer, Debian is not the perfect distro for you. You will get bored. Debian stable branch is for those who look for supreme stability and awesome performance.

I was eager to try out Debian Wheezy and I downloaded the 32-bit PAE kernel version of Debian 7 KDE. I downloaded Gnome, LXDE and XFCE versions as well which I'll cover in my subsequent reviews.

The KDE ISO is 630 GB and still fits into a CD. However, I prefer using a thumb drive and installed Debian on my favorite Asus K54C with 2.2 Ghz Core i3 processor and 2 GB RAM. Debian has a separate ISO for live boot and separate ISO for installation. I downloaded the installation one. I'll take you through my experience with Debian in the remaining part of the article with a comparison to leading KDE distros (all 32-bit, so no latest Chakra here).

rest here

Also: Getting Debian 7.0 ‘Wheezy’ Up And Running




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