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Is the Linux desktop becoming extinct?

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After a decade of looking for the "year of the Linux desktop", many Linux columnists have given up. Some say it isn't coming, while others claim that Linux has simply failed on the desktop.

If we responded to everyone who has ever criticised the Linux desktop, we wouldn't get any work done. But Miguel de Icaza isn't just anybody. He's well respected in the open source community as the founding developer of one of the two main Linux desktop environments, the Gnome desktop. To our utter amazement, even he now thinks the Linux desktop is dead!

The history of Linux: how time has shaped the penguin

In a recent post on his personal blog, Icaza shares his reasons why Linux couldn't pitch itself as a viable consumer desktop operating system. His comments are a follow-up to a Wired article that claimed that Apple OS X has far outpaced the Linux desktop. In the post, titled "What killed the Linux desktop?" Icaza, from his experience with Gnome, collates the various reasons for the Linux desktop's dire predicament.

rsrt here

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