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KDE Search and Destroy, I mean Launch

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KDE

In a galaxy far far away, long before there was Android en masse, long before touch was popular, I mean retro-popular, because we have been using the touch technology for at least two million years, long before there was any modern, simplistic interface for smartphones and tablets, there was KDE.

It’s all in the name. KDE is one of the few remaining staple desktop environments of the Linux world. It’s been around forever, and it does not seem to be slowing down. In fact, it’s evolving and growing. So far so good.

One big thing that sticks to KDE is its spartan name. KDE, as the acronym aptly puts it, is a desktop environment, but this very nomenclature underlines what this graphical computing framework is all about. And perhaps therein lies the rub. Oh, we are getting ahead of ourselves, and you may be wondering what this article is all about. Perhaps I should tell you, it’s about KDE, a desktop environment, being a great choice for non-desktop systems. There, I wrote it.

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