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SkySQL-MariaDB merger: What should you expect?

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Software

This week's merger of SkySQL and MariaDB will raise the credibility of the open-source database among big organisations, according to the new company's CEO — which in turn will help it develop beyond its internet heartland with new features for cloud and big-data uses.

SkySQL CEO Patrik Sallner said organisations hesitating about MariaDB, because they were not sure about its longer term future, would now be more likely to migrate.

"Now, there is a more solid company behind it. There is both a company and a foundation and those — looking at many other open-source projects — are the pillars for successful growth both in adoption among the community and among enterprises," he said.

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Also: MySQL Founders Reunite To Support Open-Source MariaDB

And: Biggest MySQL Related News, Day 2

And: MariaDB 10.0 and What's New with the Project




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