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KDE's Future Will be Wayland

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KDE
Software

KDE's Martin Grasslin blogged today that despite what the rest of the industry/community does, KDE's future will be on Wayland. He said he and his fellow developers decided to travel the road more annoying, if not by choice by process of elimination.

It's been interesting to follow the various desktop camps as they discuss the future of their software in relation to desktop graphical servers. Xorg has been the recipient of some mighty harsh words as far back as when it was still XFree. GNOME already stated their interest in developing for Wayland and Grasslin thinks even the smaller projects will move away from X as well.

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