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Kernel comment: Bad show, NVIDIA

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Linus Torvalds cursed out NVIDIA ten months ago when he was asked about the lack of Linux support for Optimus, NVIDIA's hybrid graphics technology. NVIDIA has now released a beta of its proprietary Linux graphics driver which finally supports Optimus. The sad thing here is that NVIDIA will be praised for the Optimus support, even though they sat back and waited for quite a while to let others build foundations they now use in their driver, which is fairly popular among users, but fairly hated among open source developers.

To add Optimus support, NVIDIA is using parts of the Prime infrastructure in the Linux kernel and X server which were built to let open source graphics drivers provide experimental support for hybrid graphics technologies for a few months now. Prime was mainly developed by Red Hat's Dave Airlie, who worked closely with developers at Intel, Texas Instruments and other companies, which contributed code as well as feedback regarding the driver interfaces.

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