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Linux Potpourri: Slack Current, KDELyteDEsktop, and Sabayon systemd

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KDE
Linux
Slack

I've gotten a bit behind the last few days and here are a few items I wanted to report about. Patrick Volkerding says Slackware Current is too current. Will Stephenson is developing a lighter KDE desktop. And Sabayon has implemented systemd.

Slackware Current is Insane!

Patrick Volkerding, founder and lead of the Slackware Linux project, posted in LinuxQuestions.org last weekend that Slackware Current needs to backtrack to something "slightly more sane versions on a few key packages."

rest here




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