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Kernel Log: Coming in 3.9 (Part 3)

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Linux

When announcing the seventh release candidate of Linux 3.9, Linus Torvalds said quite a bit about a bug fix that affects x86-32 kernels with PAE support – but he didn't indicate when he plans to release 3.9. Torvalds also noted that most of the implemented corrections were minor. If this trend continues over the coming few days, RC7 may have been the last release candidate, as Torvalds had already indicated when releasing RC6.

Unless major issues arise, version 3.9 of the Linux kernel will, therefore, likely be released some time next weekend, but certainly before the end of April. The following description of the new features in terms of the kernel's driver and networking support will conclude the Kernel Log's "Coming in 3.9" mini series. Part 1 and 2 of this series discussed the changes that the kernel developers have made in the filesystem and storage areas and to the platform and infrastructure code.

rest here

Also: The LinuxUser Kernel Column – 3.9 draws near




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