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It's an ideal time to have Linux skills, SUSE exec says

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Linux
SUSE

Even as the job market has remained generally dismal for much of the working world over the past few years, there have been a few notable exceptions.

Not only have those in IT generally faced better prospects, but the outlook for those with Linux skills has been even brighter. Year after year, surveys conducted by the Linux Foundation and others have found increasing demand for Linux know-how, as talent-hungry companies have struggled to fill such positions.

Earlier this year, IT careers site Dice reported that salaries for Linux professionals underwent a huge leap in 2012. Not long afterwards, the latest Linux Foundation report uncovered a increasingly pressing need for Linux talent.

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