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What is the openSUSE 12.3 Rescue CD?

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SUSE

The openSUSE 12.3 Rescue CD, released along with the KDE, DVD, and Gnome versions, is not designed to be installed but rather to run as a LiveCD or LiveUSB for use with workstations or home desktops for repairing or recovering data. Although the openSUSE 12.3 Rescue CD doesn't have the reputation of easy-to-use specialized rescue LiveCDs such as System Rescue CD, Clonezilla, or even Knoppix (which has had a long history of being the Swiss Army knife of Linux distributions), there are advantages in using openSUSE over other recovery LiveCDs. I myself have used Knoppix for more than half a decade for accessing files from Windows and Linux systems, saving Linux distributions, and fixing GRUB. However, considering that my systems run openSUSE, having an openSUSE recovery system seems like a no-brainer.

The openSUSE 12.3 Rescue CD clocks in at less than 600MB and easily fits in a cheap 2.0GB USB key. Even if the Rescue CD isn't running lightweight Xfce, the 12.3 is miles ahead of previous releases of openSUSE, which isn't well-known for booting up quickly or performing faster than Ubuntu or Archlinux. Boot up is exceptionally fast and matches my somewhat long in the tooth Knoppix 6.5 LiveUSB. Shutdown is also quicker than the mainstream release of openSUSE for those James Bond-esque escapes.

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