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Frustrations with Kubuntu 6 and CUPS

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Ubuntu

A few weeks ago, Jonathan had asked me on IRC in passing why kprinter and KDEPrint 3.5.1 didn't work with CUPS-1.2. My reply had been like "CUPS-1.2 hasn't even released an alpha or beta tarball -- w.t.h. does Ubuntu Dapper plan to include an SVN version of a piece of core software which has a yet unknown release date??"

So the first thing I opened after booting was Konqueror with "http://localhost:631/". Indeed, a headline "Common UNIX Printing System 1.2svn" welcomed me. Hmmm... which version from SVN did they use?

I had to run "dkpg -l cupsys" to conclude from the "r4929" part of the package name that this current Dapper Live CD included an arbitrary SVN version that's already 10 weeks old. So my next riddle was: "If they indeed do include bleeding edge, untested core system software in Dapper -- why don't they do it for real then? Why don't they go for the most recent revision available? Or why didn't they at least take the official Beta 2 release from 3 weeks ago?

Anyway, the CUPS localhost:631 page welcomed me with this message:
Administrative commands are disabled in the web interface for security reasons. Please use the GNOME CUPS manager (System > Administration > printing). /usr/share/doc/cupsys/README.Debian.gz describes the details and how to reenable it again.

Needless to say, that Kubuntu doesn't include something called "GNOME CUPS manager", neither in the menu, nor to be found from the command line.

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