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Introduction to Blender

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Software
HowTos

If you’ve ever dreamed of creating the next Shrek or Kung Fu Panda, or even working on a more modest 3D modelling project, you’ll need a piece of software like Blender.

3D modelling is a specialist area, and there aren’t too many software players in the field. Commercial studios tend to use proprietary software like Autodesk Maya or 3ds Max (Maya has the edge for film making at the moment).

If you want to be using the same software as the big commercial players, you’ll need one of those – and you’ll need to be dipping into your pocket for at least $1000 if you want to use it for more than 90 days. But if you prefer your software to come with a cheaper price tag – $0 for example – then Blender almost certainly has all the features you’ll need.

Getting Started




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