Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Some (sad) numbers on how Linux desktop adoption is going

Filed under

So this doesn’t really surprise me much, as I’ve been saying for a while that the year of Linux on the desktop is never going to come because the desktop is a dead play now, but it is sadly interesting, I think.

A propos of a Phoronix ‘discussion’ on the Mir shenanigans, I took a quick look at a couple of the more commonly-cited surveys on desktop OS usage over several years. The commonly-heard claim that Canonical had provided some kind of huge turbo boost to Linux adoption was made in the thread, by gamer2k: “You know what Canonical/Ubuntu brought Linux? Public Awareness. In the mind of the consumer, Ubuntu = Linux. If Ubuntu never came around, Linux would still be in the same state in was in 2005, holding <.5% market share, nothing more then a toy OS." Okay, that's a pretty silly way of putting it, but it's a claim that's often made by more sensible observers too. So, is it true?

rest here


Sad to say your right. Desktop adaptation is a dead-end. The switch to smartphones and tablets are where it's at. Android leads the way.. Linux has it good there. Even Google knows Linux works best:-)

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Raspberry Pi Zero: The Latest

Linux Foundation adds Open Networking Summit to event portfolio

The Linux Foundation is adding the Open Networking Summit to its event portfolio beginning with the next show scheduled for March 14 in Santa Clara, California. The ONS was initially started by companies focused on software-defined networking technologies to enable collaboration efforts centered on SDN, OpenFlow and network functions virtualization. Those events have seen collaborative efforts announced from the likes of AT&T, Google and the Linux Foundation. Read more

Richard Stallman Is Not The Father Of Open Source

Richard Stallman wants to make one thing completely clear: He is not the father. "I'm not the father of open source. If I'm the father of open source, it was conceived by artificial insemination without my knowledge or consent," he proclaimed from the keynote stage last month at Fossetcon 2015. It wasn't close to the strongest statement he made from that stage. Read more