Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

FFmpeg vs libav: A distribution maintainer point of view of split

Filed under
Gentoo
Software

It’s been a while since I wanted to write about this and since there recently has been a sort of hijack without any kind of discussion to let libav be the default implementation for Gentoo, this motivated me.

Exactly two years ago, a group consisting of the majority of FFmpeg developers took over its maintainership. While I didn’t like the methods, I’m not an insider so my opinion stops here, especially since if you pay attention to who was involved: Luca was part of it. Luca has been a Gentoo developer since probably most of us even used Gentoo and I must admit I’ve never seen him heating any discussion, rather the contrary, and it’s always been a pleasure to work with him. What happened next, after a lot of turmoil, is that the developers split in two groups: libav formed by the “secessionists” and FFmpeg.

Good, so what do we chose now?

rest here




Also:

Now the question at hand: which should be the default? FFmpeg or Libav?

How to decide?

- Libav has a strict review policy every patch goes through a review and has to be polished enough before landing the tree.

- FFmpeg merges daily what had been done in Libav and has a more lax approach on what goes in the tree and how.

The case of defaults (Libav vs FFmpeg)

More in Tux Machines

SteamOS A Linux Distribution For Gaming


Picture

SteamOS is a Debian Linux kernel-based operating system in development by Valve Corporation designed to be the primary operating system for the Steam Machine game consoles. It was initially released on December 13, 2013, alongside the start of end-user beta testing of Steam Machines.
 

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

KDE Applications 14.12.3 Officially Released

KDE Applications 14.12 has been released by its makers, and it’s a regular maintenance update. It comes with a ton of bug fixes and will be soon available in various repositories. Read more

Understanding The Linux Kernel's BPF In-Kernel Virtual Machine

BPF continues marching forward as a universal, in-kernel virtual machine for the Linux kernel. The Berkeley Packet Filter was originally designed for network packet filtering but has since been extended as eBPF to support other non-network subsystems via the bpf syscall. Here's some more details on this in-kernel virtual machine. Alexei Starovoitov presented at last month's Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit in Santa Rosa about BPF as an in-kernel virtual machine. The slides have been published for those wishing to learn more about its state and capabilities. Read more

Calligra 2.9.0 is Out

Packages for the release of KDE's document suite Calligra 2.9 are available for Kubuntu 14.10. You can get it from the Kubuntu Backports PPA. They are also in our development version Vivid. Read more