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Listen: A Great Audio Manager - If You Can Install It

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Software

Unless you are an atypical Linux user, you tend to accept the default apps featured in your distro of choice. After all, if what you use works just fine, why scavenge around for a replacement? If saying yes to that question means you miss out on adding the Listen audio player to your desktop tools, you might change your answer after trying it.

Listen doubles as a music collection organizer. It supports popular features including podcast management, Shoutcast browser directories, and direct access to lyrics, Last.fm and Wikipedia information.

The Linux desktop OS offers a good collection of audio players such as Amarok, Rhythmbox, Banshee and Audacity. Listen fits into this group with similar features.

However, its cleaner interface makes Listen an easier-to-use audio player I tend to prefer for my daily listening pleasure.

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