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And the best distro of 2012 is ...

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Linux

Let's do it, the usual end-of-the-year grand finale. So what did we have in 2012? A lot really. This was an interesting year. It started with massive disappointments, an almost total breakdown of hope, but then came back to life in the shape of the Cinnamon desktop. We also had Canonical commit to five years of support for desktops. And most magically, there's Steam for Linux in the works. However, right here, right now, we want to focus on declaring the top five distributions of the last year. Let's see what we have. Feel free to disagree, of course.

Fifth place: Fedora 17 with Cinnamon

Wow! What! Dedoimedo, are you crazy? You are adding a beta-quality distro to your list, Fedora no less? Yes, I am. The fact is, Fedora is no longer so beta as it used to be. In fact, the crashiness of the past has mostly been replaced by boredom. But there's a desktop environment that makes all the difference, and it's Cinnamon.

rest here




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