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How removing 386 support in Linux will destroy the world

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Linux

As you may have heard by now, the Linux kernel is dropping support for the 386 processor.

It's okay. I'll wait right here while you finish pushing over monitors and flipping over every desk at work in a nerd rage. I did the same thing. Get it out of your system.

I know, I know. Almost nobody on the planet uses a 386-based PC anymore. The first 386 processors started shipping in 1985 – which, according to some quick finger-counting-math, is roughly 75 thousand years ago. Heck, even many of the niche uses of the 386 processors (such as in aerospace) are being phased out.

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